VIENNA – The African Energy Chamber (AEC) would like to congratulate the Republic of Congo on becoming Africa’s 7th country to join the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

Congo is one of Africa’s mature oil producers, with production first coming online in the 1960s and reserves totaling about three billion barrels. It is also one of very few countries in Africa bucking a trend of declining oil production, with oil output increasing by 25% to reach 350,000 barrels of oil per day in 2018. This makes Congo the third biggest oil producer in sub-Saharan Africa after Nigeria and Angola. New developments in progress are expected to further boost production to 400,000 bopd by 2020.

In addition to oil, Congo also offers tremendous gas valorization and monetization opportunities in areas such as gas-to-power, urea, gas-to-liquids and methanol, with 300 to 400 billion standard cubic meters of gas reserves for the coming 20 years.

The AEC hopes that Congo’s entry into OPEC will allow the central African nation to develop stronger bilateral relations with other hydrocarbons producing nations, and facilitate the flow of investments into Congo as the country implements its new Hydrocarbons Code and is preparing a Gas Code to structure its gas value chain.

 

 The African Energy Chamber (AEC), which has been advocating for upstream producers, service providers, downstream suppliers, and governmental bodies throughout the continent, has been formally established.

Backed by executives from across the continents oil and gas, power, and renewables industries, the AEC is the Continent’s voice for the ongoing change and progression in the African energy industry. From the robust regulatory reforms of Angola and the interest of Congo-Brazzaville in OPEC, to the impressive local content strides taken by South Sudan, the AEC firmly stands with the re-emergence of Africa’s energy industry.

The AEC initiative comes as the advancements in Africa’s energy sector, and its revamped development agenda, are at the center of international investors’ interests. Africa is continuously proving itself to be capable of developing large scale progressive energy initiatives, such as Equatorial Guinea’s recent plan to construct a natural gas mega-hub. Over the past 12 months alone, Mozambique saw a final investment decision on a $7bn LNG development program, Cameroon became the first African country to bring a floating LNG platform on stream, Uganda gave the green light to lay the world’s longest electrically-heated crude oil pipeline, Nigeria is taking significant strides to rebalance its crude refining capabilities, and Burkina Faso commissioned one of the world’s largest hybrid fuel/solar power plant.

“Africa is a fast-growing energy powerhouse,” NJ Ayuk, CEO of the Centurion Law Group, one of the AEC founding members, said. “New oil frontiers are opening up in West Africa, investment in gas infrastructure is picking up in West and East Africa, while landmark reforms are expecting to transform the way natural resources are being exploited in markets such as Nigeria and South Africa. There truly has never been a better time to do business in Africa.”

In promoting such opportunities within a pan- and pro-Africa institution, the AEC advocates for the growth and expansion of indigenous African companies across the continent. From personnel training to community partnerships and relationship building, the AEC is a unique home for African companies to grow and take the lead in the development of their continent. The Energy Chamber equally focuses on promoting sensible local content, pushing for EITI, mutually beneficial joint ventures, transfer of technologies, and advocating for an enabling environment for business growth.

As African nations revise their regulatory frameworks, such as the recent hydrocarbons regulations in Nigeria, Gabon, and Congo, the AEC works to provide access to a unique pool of policy makers and seasoned experts to engage into a meaningful dialogue with industry stakeholders to shape policy. The AEC’s also services international companies seeking to invest or expand in Africa by providing them with inside-track information and contacts to ensure successful partnerships and market penetration and expansion strategies.

 

 

 

 The African Energy Chamber (AEC) welcomes the launch of Equatorial Guinea’s natural gas megahub project phase 1 as a key initiative towards gas utilization and monetization in the Gulf of Guinea.

The plans of Equatorial Guinea’s Ministry of Mines and Hydrocarbons to build a gas megahub aggregating gas from upstream projects to deliver it to onshore industries were first revealed at the Africa Oil & Power Investor Forum in May 2018 in London by H.E. Gabriel M. Obiang Lima, Minister of Mines and Hydrocarbons.

The announcement followed the signing of an agreement with American independent Noble Energy to supply gas from the Alen and Aseng fields to the Punta Europa Terminal, in order to replace declining output from the Alba field.

The project will notably entail the building of new infrastructure to link existing and new upstream projects with the Punta Europa gas processing hub as a primary industrial gas user in the region.

The AEC board welcomes the initiative as major step towards developing a stronger African natural gas market and recognizes the role of Equatorial Guinea’s initiatives such as LNG2Africa in creating new markets for Africa’s natural gas and LNG in the region.